Archives for pbeaudette

What 1 Question Gets You the Right Consultant

Hiring the most relevant consultant to your business or industry is key to making changes within your company and making them efficiently. Turning processes around, creating relevant data and formulating meaningful financial information lie at the core of any business change.

The most important question is “What is your experience?”

It’s not just about consulting experience, but also hands-on, real practical experience doing what they will do for you. While the consultant

may have extensive experience, the people he sends you must as well. Experience is a result of years doing the work, the management or the financial control of a company. If the consultant they send looks like he or she is 26, the chance of their having years of experience greatly diminish. On the other hand, if you hire an IT consultant, that could be an advantage.

Bonus Questions

So here’s the rub.  If you hire an experienced consultant, will they know the current trends in business? What a great question to ask! How about, “What strategies have you recommended to businesses who are challenged with rapid growth?” “What fast track strategies have you suggested for the business office trying to keep up with uncontrolled growth?” Or to be more specific, “What software changes have you suggested when invoicing falls too far behind?”

These are questions specific to your goals. An experienced consultant who has kept up with current products and trends will more likely be able to help you resolve this.

Your savings will come in time (money) saved by the consultant and your business. The quicker you can resolve your situation, the quicker you’ll be saving. Remember as well, you need to dedicate a team of employees to work through this.

Consultants save you money in the short or long term.

Succession – A Case History

A 70’s thriving business is not a guarantee of a 90’s success.

A medical widget supplier did a wonderful job of starting a vendor business of medical devices. After all, he had formerly been a user and installer of these products himself; he saw the need for a supplier to furnish these devices locally. So, he started his own business.

From the start, the demPeople talkingand and need was validated. Business got off to a fast start and the pace never slowed. Hiring became essential and a growth from 2 to 10 employees happened quickly. With the growth came a good reputation and recognition in the business. Deliveries were timely, products had quality and receivables were worked out with all customers. If a customer needed a little extra time, he got it. The company participated in trade shows, professional organizations and donated generously to non-profits.

Of the employees, one was the owner’s son. He had come on board to help out and ended up staying. His place was at the counter for sales. He had not gotten that position because of his personality. The other employees worked around him to maintain satisfied customers. The time came to hire an outside sales representative to seek new accounts. The new representative was experienced in the field and was able to make technical referrals to the customers. In the 80’s and 90’s the business flourished. In the late 80’s, the owner and founder of the business died unexpectedly. The family was devastated and the employees were left wondering “what next?” Customers paid their respects but expected no changes in service.

The family grieved but with the support of a few key employees, was able to pull it all together to keep going. The founder’s wife came into the company as a bookkeeper/controller to keep track of the financial aspects.   As the economy recovered from the recession of the early 90’s, business grew. The outside sales representative was promoted to president of the company since neither the son nor the wife were viable figureheads for the leadership role. Another outside sale representative was hired. A side consulting business was formed that would make recommendations to clients for specific products to use in special cases. The consulting business returned higher profits which in turn boosted the company bottom line.

A few obstacles were encountered. There had never been a succession plan, after all the owner was not that old. He had not spent any time grooming anyone to take over. The son, who was not ambitious to begin with, was not a likely successor. The wife was not technically knowledgeable of the products and was not interested in leading or managing employees. She was not one to move the company forward. The newly named president had limited power. He had no control over the finances which left him responsible for overseeing employees and customers. Through all this, the company moved forward without much being said. Employees were in the dark.

By the mid 90’s, the wife was in her 70’s and her energy level was diminishing. The concept of growth did not interest her as she preferred keeping things simple and easy.  Her work days soon became ½ days and part of those was napping at her desk. The wife died and left everything to the son who didn’t have a clue about what to do.

The company became lethargic and attitudes took a nose dive.  Inventory shrunk and product availability grew sparse. Employees began seeking other jobs and when business became anemic, he decided to find a buyer. The timing couldn’t have been worse. Another recession had started and the value of the company dropped. He wanted out so bad, he took the first marginal offer that came his way and sold. The company sold for roughly half of what it had been worth at one time and with inaccurate inventory data, he was left with nothing at the end.

Succession planning is essential. Whether the transfer is to a family member, an employee or outside parties, maintaining the value and growing the value of a company are essential to survival in today’s business world. Customers look for continuous improvement, employees look for continued stability and successors look for an opportunity. The strategy of continuance is one that can be worked on daily for short term and long term success.

Leading Edge Business Strategies, LLC is a consulting firm for small business. Paul Beaudette is the President and has over 30 years of successful business experience managing companies to sustainable profits and leading employees to productivity and efficiency resulting in growth and profits.

Contact us at info@leadingedgebusinessstrategies.com

 

In Business with Children – a Succession Story

Now that people are living longer, healthier lives, they are no longer willing to give up the reins of the family business sometimes even into their 80’s. That puts the next generation into their 50’s and 60’s. How do they plan for their retirement?

Jeff and his sister want to take over the family business from mom & dad who are in their 70’s. Mom & dad show no signs of letting go. Jeff is in his 50’s and wants to move the business along into the 21st century, increase revenues and provide for his own future. So, how does he fire mom & dad? People talking

Jeff is sensitive to the fact that his parents founded the business and are just as emotionally attached to it as they are
financially. They never set money aside for retirement and even though they take 8 weeks off in the winter to warmer climates, they still run the show from southern latitudes. Jeff feels like he can never assume full control. His sister is marginally interested in the future but deep down expects Jeff to take care of that. Another brother who is not involved with the business  lives on the west coast.

This scenario plays itself out too often. There have been few to no conversations about the ‘when mom & dad get older’; they’ve never initiated the conversation because they are living day to day until some outside force imposes a change. Many times, the younger generation doesn’t want to offend the parents and create a morbid discussion about “when you die”. So it is left untouched until it is too late. What is the best option in these cases?

It’s time for a talk around the campfire. A skilled business coach with the gift of sensitivity can bring this discussion to light with the entire family involved. In the scenario above, all members of the family, even the one not involved in the business, must participate in the conversation. After all, he is set to inherit a part of the net worth even if the other two siblings buy the business. ‘Ouch!’ Really? He’s ever done anything for the business. But, he is an equal sibling. You may think he deserves none of it, but he thinks differently. It may not be an equal share, but it’s still a share.

If this is being handled when it’s too late (death of a parent or both), this can get ugly. But if it is handled while they are still around, they can have input. The screaming can happen before the will is executed instead of after and normally it is split on a more even keel. There’s something about the parents not being around that elevates the conversation and settlement to an ugly level.

When the succession planning is done ahead with a third party leading the discussion, it is easier to discuss with a business consultant in the room. A good business consultant will regulate the conversation and bring the greed and control levers to a neutral position with thoughtfulness. All parties need to benefit in some form. Telling your parents that it is “time to step aside and let us take over” is usually realized by parents during the course of the conversations, making the end result easier.

So don’t wait until it’s too late. Find someone with the gift of compassion and start thinking of this 5 years ahead, make that 10 years ahead. Begin preparing the business for the change and for mom & dad to step aside. They’ll feel respected and appreciated for how it was done and will be prepared to make the move much easier.

Leading Edge Business Strategies, LLC is a consulting firm for small business. Paul Beaudette is the President and has over 30 years of successful business experience leading companies to sustainable profits, new growth strategies and business sustainability.

What Will Your Profit Margin Be This Year?

Did you predict an end of year profit in January?

If you didn’t, why not? What are you afraid of? What do you fear will happen if you throw a number at it and don’t achieve it? Or, what if you surpass it?

Every year we hesitate to forecast the numbers for the next year. Why? Let’s look at it:

  1. Do we feel the whole process is out of our control?
  2. Are we dependent on the economy?
  3. Are we dependent on the stock market performance?
  4. Does it depend on how certain employees will perform?
  5. Does it depend on how you’ll perform?
  6. Will the government shut down and affect your business?
  7. Are you vulnerable to a supplier on the brink of a buyout or failure?
  8. How about your biggest customer, are they on the fence with switching to another company?
  9. Is global competition going to price you out?
  10. Are you unable to find qualified help?

These are all very valid concerns that all businesses face. The question is, should they affect our outcomes? Sure, they make affect our volume in revenues, but depending on how much control you have over your company, they should minimally affect it. Your profitability is controllable. You just need to ask yourself the right questions, contemplate different scenarios and develop strategies for each that protect your profitability.

Leading Edge Business Strategies is offering a 15% discount for any company that wants to guarantee their bottom line for 2017. This package includes coaching for budget development, scenario creation and strategy formation. You’ll be provided with a monthly budget that you can use as a road map for your business throughout the year. You’ll have predictable monthly profits to use as benchmarks and be able to make adjustments as you work through.

Make this year a year of predicted success. Call today for a free consultation and quote.

(207) 577-1948 or email: paul@leadingedgebusinessstrategies.com .

Quotes are based on company size, number of employees, revenues and sales structure. All quotes are written showing fee, discounts and net payable amount.

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Sneak a peek at my answers to the questions above on page 2.

Suggested answers to questions from page 1:

  1. No. The process of developing a budget should be completely in your control. You have the reins of everything about your business. If you don’t, who the heck does? It does not  just happen. You make it happen.
  2. No. When the economy improves, our revenues go up and vice versa. Our profitability can remain the same when we take those reins and control the horses. With enough planning, your profitability should improve when the economy improves, but profits should not go down when the reverse happens.
  3. No. The stock market affects investors. It influences how people think about the economy. It scares people when it nose dives and makes people happy when it skyrockets. But pay attention to what you do best in your business and your customers will keep coming.
  4. No. If it does, sell them the company. They should not have that type of control over your bottom line.
  5. Yes. You are in charge and have the power to affect your bottom line.
  6. Yes. It’ll affect your revenues (income) but you still have control of your profitability. Make adjustments. I know that’s not easy.
  7. No. You should know your supplier well enough if that will happen. Make a decision if that should be your supplier going forward if that is the case.
  8. No. Just like your biggest supplier, know your biggest customers as well. You should know most of your customers well, but know them like family.
  9. Probably. What is your strategy ‘in case’ that happens? Be prepared for your competition making changes.
  10. No. Treat your help fairly and pay then well, offer them good benefits and they’ll take care of 1 through 9 by default.

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Have YOU had Your Customers for a Sleepover Yet?

But, it’s good customer service!

Getting and keeping customers today is harder than ever. When opportunities arise to WOW! the customer, you need to jump on it immediately.
Take a look at this story of an opportunity that presented itself in what could have been a dire situation for both the customers and the employees. But the lead manager of the John Lewis department store in London made lemonade.
This inspiring story is delivered in this fun Prezi as you follow the adventure of an open-minded, risk-taking manager (Deborah), who did what was right for the customers, all 100+ of them.
Ask yourself, would you stick your neck out to do this? The last few slides say it the best: “It shows that great service isn’t a set of rules, it’s a mindset.”

Use right and left arrows at the bottom to view presentation at your pace. Some slides have sound, not all.

Listen carefully to Deborah as she describes the experience. Find the key culture characteristics that drive this behavior and how as a manager, she was totally comfortable in doing this at a cost. How does that culture become not only unquestioned, but supported by senior managers? And note the enabling, not constraining nature of the effort.

“Sharing your customers’ problem and doing all you can to help solve them.”

Share your customer service hero experience here.