5 Strategies on Structuring an Empowered Business – Part III

This is the 3rd of a 5 Part series on getting and keeping your business organized

See also: Part I;  Part II

Allied Partners

5 Lessons Capture

 

Every business has to depend on outside sources for products, services and support. The relationship you establish with them will help you serve your customers to the highest level of satisfaction. Vendors and suppliers should become business partners with your business to the point that when a problem arises, they are there to help and support you through it.

Recently, an order came through for my retail client ordering custom tables for his restaurant customer. The paint color on the furniture came in a shade different than intended. After further research, it was determined that the sample that had originally been presented by the vendor was furnished while the customer intended on a slightly lighter shade from a color swatch. When the order was placed, the customer did not notice that the color description on the purchase order was not what he chose.

Colors are typical issues when ordering of products. But the question always arises, who is responsible for the error? It could be said that either party was wrong. The end user, the customer, rarely wants to acknowledge the mistake. They remember what they said and it doesn’t matter what the purchase order had written on it. Customers also do not want to pay twice for a product they are buying (nor does the retailer or vendor).

Here is how this was resolved. The vendor offered to replace the tables at no extra cost OR give the retailer a credit that could be extended to the customer. The restaurateur chose to wait for the right color and was allowed to use the delivered tables until the new ones arrived. This is a vendor who cares about his customer’s customers. He avoided a hardship for his retailer and satisfied the customer. Allowing the customer to use the delivered tables while the new tables were being manufactured is an expensive task. He will never be able to resell those as new. But the correction is a long term investment in his retailer. The retailer gets to salvage his customer who can now tell a good story to his friends.

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With vendors and suppliers, always work to establish solid partnerships. Spell out the details of how business will be handled when things go right and when they go wrong. Don’t wait for something to happen to find out. Ask them how they have handled those things in the past. Make them a part of your business and expect the same from them. Don’t do business with suppliers you don’t trust. You have to be able to trust that they are looking out for you. They will want to trust that you will help them when they need it too. That’s a partnership. When you open the lines of communication, trust ensues.

As a customer, how do you want to be treated when an order doesn’t work out? After you’ve answered that question, ask yourself, “Are you treating your customers that way?”

Tell us what you look for as a customer.

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